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Classwork / Homework For:                                                                                                         Mr. Lumio's CANVAS site

 

Thursday 1/17/2019 -All Classes- Force and Motion 1.3 - This lesson begins with students generating ideas about what various arrows and lines might mean in scientific diagrams that represent how objects move. This prepares them for encountering the visual representations in the Force and Motion Simulation (Sim). After becoming familiar with the Sim, students explore how they can use this digital tool to make an object’s velocity change in different ways. Then, students use the Sim to gather evidence about how forces cause specific velocity changes. In this activity, they determine the direction in which a force must be exerted to achieve specific velocity changes. For homework, students focus on the crosscutting concept of Cause and Effect as they sort different effects according to the force that caused them.  HW - Complete the Force and Motion 1.3.5 Homework.  Review the Force and Motion unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

 Review your notes for 10-15 minutes each night.  STUDY SMARTER, NOT HARDER!!!!!! 

 

Wednesday 1/16/2019 -All Classes- Students will answer questions while watching Cosmos Episode 3 - "When Knowledge Conquered Fear".  This episode details how forces in the universe influence the motion of other objects.  Complete the question worksheet HW - Review the Force and Motion unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Tuesday 1/15/2019 -All Classes- Force and Motion 1.2 - Students are introduced to their role as student physicists working with the Universal Space Agency (USA) to determine what happened to an asteroid sample-collecting pod that went awry. The space agency lost contact with the pod for a few seconds, and rather than stopping and docking at the space station as planned, the pod moved in the opposite direction. To prepare for the investigation, students share initial ideas about two claims that might explain what happened to the pod. After that, they conduct a hands-on investigation about changing an object's motion, both from a stationary starting position and as an already-moving object. Students determine the five ways that the motion of an object can change and begin to develop an understanding that forces cause changes in motion.  HW - Complete the Force and Motion 1.2.5 Homework.  Review the Force and Motion unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Monday 1/14/2019 -All Classes- Force and Motion 1.1 Pre-Unit Assessment- Science folder check.  Students complete a Pre-Unit Assessment consisting of 14 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions in which students analyze and interpret data and construct explanations. The Pre-Unit Assessment is diagnostic and designed to reveal students’ understanding of the unit’s core content—including unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts—prior to instruction by indicating, for formative purposes, where students initially fall along the levels of the Progress Build.  HW - Review the Force and Motion unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

 

Friday 1/11/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 4.4 Evolutionary History End-of-Unit Assessment- Students complete an end-of-unit assessment consisting of 16 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions in which they analyze and interpret data, evaluate evidence, and construct explanations. The end-of-unit assessment indicates where students fall along the levels of the Progress Build after instruction by measuring their mastery of the specific ideas, both unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts, that comprise each level of the Progress Build.  HW - Get you notebook ready for a Monday Check.

Thursday 1/10/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 4.3.3- Students craft a final written argument following the directions on the CER Argument Template. Students’ final written arguments also serve as three-dimensional performance assessments, with rubrics provided to indicate students’ progress with unit-specific science concepts, crosscutting concepts, and the science practices of Constructing Explanations; Engaging in Argument from Evidence; and Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information.   HW - Finish your written argument from today's lesson.  Prepare for tomorrow's Evolutionary History Assessment. End of Unit Assessment Tomorrow!

Wednesday 1/9/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 4.2- Students receive new evidence cards about ostriches and crocodiles. They combine these cards with the higher-quality observations about the Tometti fossil from Lesson 4.1 and analyze this complete set of evidence. Initially, they consider each evidence card independently, annotating the cards to support deeper thinking. They then work in pairs to consider each evidence card as it relates to each of the two claims they are considering in the Science Seminar sequence.   HW - Finish investigating the new fossil evidence from today's lesson. End of Unit Assessment FRIDAY

Tuesday 1/8/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 4.1- In this lesson, students apply their knowledge of the processes of evolution to a new branch of the evolutionary tree. Students are invited to help a museum categorize another unknown fossil: the Tometti fossil. Students are introduced to the Chapter 4 Question: Is the Tometti fossil more closely related to ostriches or to crocodiles? They then use the unit’s Evidence Criterion to sort observations made by other student paleontologists, preparing to use these observations as possible evidence.   HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 4.1.4 Homework.  End of Unit Assessment FRIDAY

Monday 1/7/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 3.3- Students examine a variety of structures—from whales, wolves, and the Mystery Fossil—in order to determine whether the Mystery Fossil is more closely related to whales or wolves. A message from the museum director informs students that today they will finally determine where the Mystery Fossil should be placed. Students examine information about body structures for whales and wolves, determining that there are many structures shared by both types of organisms, but that a few diagnostic shared structures can be used to distinguish them. In the next activity, students examine whales, wolves, and the Mystery Fossil, focusing on diagnostic shared structures that will help them to place the Mystery Fossil on an evolutionary tree (and in the museum). Students then make a final determination about which type of organism—whales or wolves—the Mystery Fossil is more closely related to, complete an evolutionary tree diagram to show their thinking, and write an argument for homework explaining where in the museum they decided to place the Mystery Fossil.   HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 3.3.5 Homework.

 

Friday 1/4/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 3.2- Students continue to consider how certain structures that are shared by two species but not shared by a third species can be used to determine relative relatedness. They start with a Warm-Up that asks them to choose where to place a specific type of species on an evolutionary tree, based on the structures it shares with other species on the tree. Next, they watch a video that describes how paleontologists use diagnostic structures to determine relatedness between species. Students investigate shared structures in whales, using the Sim, and use differences in shared structures to decide how to place a variety of ancient whales on the Cetaceans branch of the Sim. Students participate in the Word Relationships discourse routine to synthesize thinking about shared structures and relatedness.   HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 3.2.4 Homework.

Thursday 1/3/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 3.1- At the start of this new chapter, students begin to consider how populations can get repeatedly separated into different environments, which leads to multiple new branches on the evolutionary tree. Each branch represents a new species that can have some similarities to and some differences from the common ancestor population. Students use K'NEX building pieces to create physical models of different possible species on a model evolutionary tree branch, representing how both similarities and differences in structures arise over time. Students then create a model showing inferences they have made about uniquely shared structures, based on knowledge of structures of a given common ancestor.   HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 3.1.4 Homework.

Wednesday 1/2/2019 -All Classes- Evolutionary History 2.7- This differentiated lesson is designed to provide students with a targeted review and exploration of key concepts and ideas; it is also an opportunity to explore new content for students who have developed full understanding of the ideas from Chapters 1 and 2. Based on results from formative assessments in the Critical Juncture, students are placed in one of three groups. Although all students are engaged in similar activities throughout the lesson, each group’s activity is designed to help students focus on concepts best suited to their level of progress in the unit thus far. All three groups will begin with activities in the Natural Selection Simulation and then continue to activities in the Evolutionary History Simulation.   HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 2.7.6 Self Assessment Homework.

Monday 12/24/18 thru Tuesday 1/1/2019 -No School, Holiday Break.

 

Friday 12/21/18 -All Classes- Holiday celebration.  HW - No Homework.

Thursday 12/20/18 -All Classes- Evolutionary History Vocabulary Quiz.  Evolutionary History 2.6- Students complete a Critical Juncture Assessment  consisting of 12 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions. The Critical Juncture Assessment is designed to reveal students’ current levels of understanding about the unit’s core content, and the results are used to place each student at a particular level of the Progress Build. These assessment results indicate students’ progress from the beginning of the unit and are used to group students for differentiated instruction in the next lesson.  HW - Complete the all of today's EH 2.6 Critical Juncture Assessment activities.

Wednesday 12/19/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 2.5- Students reflect on evolutionary time and what differences in body structure mean. They complete a Modeling Tool activity that asks them to explain how species that share a common ancestor can become very different from one another. Next, they use a vocabulary routine, Word Relationships, in which they use key terms to create sentences that answer the Chapter 2 Question. Finally, students reflect on how their new understanding of differences in bone structure and speciation might help them to think about differences in modern whales and wolves.  HW - Complete the all of today's EH 2.5 activities. Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz TOMORROW!

Tuesday 12/18/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 2.4- Students begin to construct a foundational understanding of how long life on Earth has been evolving. This allows them to understand how descendant species from a common ancestor can be so different from one another. They work with a calendar analogy in which the history of Earth is condensed onto a single calendar year, allowing them to grasp the scale of time. Students also engage in a card sort in which they sort six examples of significant structural changes based on their estimate of how long those changes might have taken to occur. The intent with this second activity is to highlight the idea that small changes accumulate into large changes over very long periods of time.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 2.4.5 Homework. Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Thursday!

Monday 12/17/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 2.3- In this lesson, students return to the article set Where Do Species Come From? in order to carefully explain the examples of speciation they read about in the last lesson and how environmental changes influenced changes to body structures. Students apply principles of natural selection and evolution to consider how two species that descended from a common ancestor population came to have differences in their shared body structures. They then use the Natural Selection Simulation to investigate how environmental changes might influence how a common ancestor population could evolve into two new descendant species.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 2.3.4 Homework. Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Thursday!

 

Friday 12/14/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 2.2- Students learn about the process of speciation by reading one of three articles from the Where Do Species Come From? article set. Each student becomes an expert on one of three speciation stories: “Galápagos Tortoises,” “Polar Bears,” and “Flightless Ducks.” Students learn more about how each of these groups became a new species over time. Each speciation story emphasizes the role different environments play in creating unique selection pressures that favor changes in body structures. Students read actively, focusing on summarizing, and then share their annotations with a peer.  HW - Complete the all of today's activities. Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Thursday 12/13/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 2.1- Students begin to focus on understanding why the bone structures that are shared between different species can look very different. They are reminded that paleontologists make careful observations, and they practice this skill during today’s lesson. Students work with a partner to closely observe the front limbs of three different species: the dire wolf, the fruit bat, and Titanotylopus. They then revisit the Species Cards that they used in Lesson 1.2 in order to find more evidence about the environments and behaviors of these species. This new evidence enables students to draw links between differences in body structures and the environments in which these species live.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 2.1.4 Homework.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Wednesday 12/12/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 1.5- At the start of this lesson, students learn that the Mystery Fossil was carrying a fetus. This new information allows students to conclude that the Mystery Fossil shares the ability to have live birth with the whale and the wolf but not with the egg-laying crocodile. Next, students look for body structures that are shared among the the Mystery Fossil, whales, and wolves. They learn that the Mystery Fossil, whales, and wolves have many body structures in common, implying that they all share a common ancestor. By creating a visual model to predict the body structures of a common ancestor, students show their understanding of how body structures are inherited.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 1.5.5 Self Assessment Homework.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Tuesday 12/11/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 1.4- Students continue to learn about similarities between species. After looking at shared structures in the forelimbs of two species, students read about how body structures reveal a shared common ancestor between whales and humans. The teacher models a new Active Reading strategy: summarizing. Students discuss the text by reflecting on their annotations. For homework, students explore the Evolutionary History Simulation.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 1.4.5 Homework.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Monday 12/10/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 1.3- Students continue to learn about similarities between species. After looking at shared structures in the forelimbs of two species, students read about how body structures reveal a shared common ancestor between whales and humans. The teacher models a new Active Reading strategy: summarizing. Students discuss the text by reflecting on their annotations. For homework, students explore the Evolutionary History Simulation.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 1.3.5 Homework.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

 

Friday 12/7/18 -All Classes -Evolutionary History 1.2- This lesson introduces students to the question that they will investigate over the course of the unit: Why do species, both living and extinct, share similarities and also have differences? Through their investigations, students will learn about the evolutionary history of life on Earth. In this lesson, students will work toward understanding the Unit Question by learning how paleontologists determine relatedness between different species on Earth, past and present. They do this by comparing museum fossil exhibits, which are often organized so that more closely related organisms are near one another. Students begin by examining a sketch of the Mystery Fossil during the Warm-Up. Then, they watch a short video that introduces the work of paleontology as well as the fictitious museum for which they will do their work in the unit. Next, students complete a card sort to consider how they might group different species, both living and extinct, according to similar body structures. Through these activities, students learn that making careful observations is an important practice in paleontology.  HW - Complete the Evolutionary History 1.2.5 Homework.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Thursday 12/6/18 -All Classes -Students will complete a check of their Natural Selection Internship folders. Begin Evolutionary History 1.1- Students complete a pre-unit assessment consisting of 16 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions in which students analyze and interpret data and construct explanations. The pre-unit assessment is diagnostic and designed to reveal students’ understanding of the unit’s core content—including unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts—prior to instruction by indicating, for formative purposes, where students initially fall along the levels of the Progress Build.  HW - Finish the pre-unit assessment.  Review the Evolutionary History unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Wednesday 12/5/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 10- In this last day of the internship, interns will peer review the work of a classmate.  Interns will critique the work based on the Proposal checklist, and the Proposal Grading Rubric.  Interns will then revise their proposal and submit a copy for consideration.  Our Internship coordinator (Mr. Lumio) will evaluate each proposal using the Grading Rubric HW - Get your Science folders ready for tomorrow's check.

Tuesday 12/4/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 9- In this last day of the Proposal phase, interns work to complete their Final Proposals. Interns work with the internship coordinator to convert the Project Summary from Day 4 into the Proposal Introduction, and will convert the Trade-Offs Reflection responses they submitted in Day 6 into the Proposal Conclusion. At the end of this workday, interns will make final edits and submit the Proposal. HW - Complete and submit today's "After Hours" work.

Monday 12/3/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 8- Interns receive and process feedback from the project director about the evidence they included in their outlines of the design decisions. After discussing the feedback with their colleagues, interns learn more about how scientists and engineers communicate information professionally. They then spend the rest of the day working on the Design Decisions paragraphs. Using their outlines, the Proposal Rubric, and the project director’s feedback as a guide, they write a convincing argument for why their design is optimal. Interns focus on how the decisions they made about the design features led to the final results of their optimal design. HW - Complete and submit today's "After Hours" work.

 

Friday 11/30/18 -All Classes - Continue to work on Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 7- Interns begin the Proposal phase of the internship. The proposal is designed as a specific kind of scientific argument that focuses on the principles and criteria that are important to the discipline of engineering. Interns begin by supporting the claim that their selected designs are optimal, and must then support their claims with evidence gathered from the Design Tool and information from the Dossier. Interns first focus on learning which sources of evidence—test results, data analysis, and background research—can be used to write a strong proposal. Next, they spend time gathering more evidence to support their claims. Finally, interns create and submit an outline for feedback from the project director.  HW - Complete and submit today's "After Hours" work (Proposal Outline).

 Thursday 11/29/18 -All Classes -Begin to work on Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 7- Interns begin the Proposal phase of the internship. The proposal is designed as a specific kind of scientific argument that focuses on the principles and criteria that are important to the discipline of engineering. Interns begin by supporting the claim that their selected designs are optimal, and must then support their claims with evidence gathered from the Design Tool and information from the Dossier. Interns first focus on learning which sources of evidence—test results, data analysis, and background research—can be used to write a strong proposal. Next, they spend time gathering more evidence to support their claims. Finally, interns create and submit an outline for feedback from the project director.  HW - Continue to work on today's "After Hours" work which includes your Proposal outline.

Wednesday 11/28/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 6- Interns work on final design iterations after receiving and processing feedback from the project director. The entire group shares and discusses feedback; then each team sets goals for each criterion and reconsiders priorities for the project criteria. They learn that trade-offs are part of the design process and they consider the trade-offs necessary to choose optimal designs. HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Tuesday 11/27/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 5- Interns are introduced to The Design Cycle and iterative testing through a brief video that explains the process: Plan, Build, Test, Analyze. After reviewing the layout of their MalariaMed Data sheets, interns begin to apply the practices of iterative testing to their designs, using MalariaMed to test different sequences and doses of antimalarial drugs. Finally, the internship coordinator guides the team through a data evaluation activity by color-coding a data set.     HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Monday 11/26/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 4- Interns are to complete the Design Cycle and iterative testing process, and complete the Project Summary found in the Day 4 message.     HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

 

Wednesday-Friday 11/21-23/18 -No School- Thanksgiving Holiday

Tuesday 11/20/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 4- Interns conclude their background research by reading about the different antimalarial drugs available for their treatments in this MalariaMed model. Interns then run additional isolated tests to better understand the effects of different antimalarial drugs, doses, and days of treatment on the project criteria. To close the Research phase, interns complete the Project Summary for after-hours work, summarizing what they understand about the project so far and which will be used as the introduction to their proposals at the end of the internship.    HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Monday 11/19/18 -All Classes - We are going to take a look at Natural selection at work as documented in the COSMOS Video Series.    HW - Complete all of your Natural Selection Internship "After Hours" work from days 1-3.

 

Friday 11/16/18 -All Classes -  Finish up Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 3- As interns continue in the Research phase, they focus more on how drug resistance occurs in parasite populations and how the choices biomedical engineers make for drugs used in malaria treatments affect the overall distribution of traits for drug resistance in these populations. Interns re-watch the Natural Selection in Malaria animation segment and read more about drug resistance. They return to the MalariaMed Design Tool in order to investigate the effect of using one drug on long-term drug resistance, and then discuss the pros and cons of each drug type.  Read and annotate Chapter 5 Article "Designing Antimalarial Drugs" from DAY 4.  HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Thursday 11/15/18 -All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 3- As interns continue in the Research phase, they focus more on how drug resistance occurs in parasite populations and how the choices biomedical engineers make for drugs used in malaria treatments affect the overall distribution of traits for drug resistance in these populations. Interns re-watch the Natural Selection in Malaria animation segment and read more about drug resistance. They return to the MalariaMed Design Tool in order to investigate the effect of using one drug on long-term drug resistance, and then discuss the pros and cons of each drug type.    HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Wednesday 11/14/18 -Period 5 Must finish Day1 activities before moving on to today's internship lesson. All Classes - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 2- Interns continue the Research phase and are introduced to the practice of taking Daily Message Notes to identify the key tasks and any important concepts. Interns are formally introduced to the term selection pressure in multiple ways: they actively read and discuss background information and engage in a hands-on activity that simulates mutations in a malaria parasite population when an antimalarial drug is introduced to the environment.    HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Tuesday 11/13/18 -All Classes - Science Folder Check - Natural Selection Engineering Internship Day 1- Interns begin the Research phase of their internship by revisiting and applying content from the Natural Selection unit in preparation for designing solutions to an engineering problem. They read the Welcome to Futura! message and watch a video that introduces them to the project director and the Request for Proposals (RFP). Interns are introduced to the Dossier and use Active Reading strategies to begin background research on malaria, and then explore the MalariaMed Design Tool.  HW - Complete today's "After Hours" work.

Monday 11/12/18 -No School - Veteran's Day Observation

 

Friday 11/9/18 -All Classes -  To round out our Natural Selection unit we are going to take a look at Natural selection at work as documented in the COSMOS Video Series.  Finish up the End of Unit Assessment make ups. HW - Get your Science folder ready for Tuesday's check.

Thursday 11/8/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 4.4.   Students complete an End-of-Unit Assessment consisting of 18 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions in which they analyze and interpret data, evaluate evidence, and construct explanations. The End-of-Unit Assessment indicates where students fall along the levels of the Progress Build after instruction by measuring their mastery of the specific ideas, both unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts, that comprise each level of the Progress Build. The End-of-Unit Assessment also measures students’ understanding of important supporting content not explicitly included in the Progress Build. HW - Get your Science folder ready for Tuesday's check.

Wednesday 11/7/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 4.3.   Students apply their understanding of how natural selection changes the trait distributions in populations. They develop their skills with written argumentation as they explain why the sticklebacks became more armored and faster. To prepare for this task, students begin by considering what makes an argument convincing. They then use the Reasoning Tool to help them articulate how their evidence supports their claims. Once they have organized their thinking, students complete the Science Seminar sequence by writing a scientific argument that explains the change in trait distribution among the sticklebacks. Students’ final written arguments also serve as three-dimensional performance assessments, with rubrics provided to indicate students’ progress with unit-specific science concepts, crosscutting concepts, and the science practices of Constructing Explanations; Engaging in Argument from Evidence; and Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information. Stickleback Evidence Cards HW - Complete the Homework and Self Assessment portions of today's lesson (Section 4.3.4, 4.3.5).  End of Unit Assessment TOMORROW!

Tuesday 11/6/18 -No School, Election day.

Monday 11/5/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 4.2.   Students engage in a Science Seminar, discussing two claims that may explain why the stickleback population changed over time. Students prepare for this discussion by reviewing evidence from Lesson 4.1 and practicing their arguments with a partner. The Science Seminar begins with a prompt that asks students to consider a specific piece of evidence and how it connects to the claims. Students then continue the discussion by taking turns analyzing the other pieces of evidence and how they relate to the claims. For homework, students reflect on the Science Seminar and whether or not it changed their thinking about the claims.  HW - Complete the Homework portion of today's lesson (Section 4.2.4).  End of Unit Assessment Thursday!

 

Friday 11/2/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 4.1.   Students apply their knowledge about natural selection to a new phenomenon: a population of stickleback fish has less armor today than in past generations. Students learn that the decreased armor in sticklebacks allows them to swim faster. They consider two claims about what caused the sticklebacks to have less armor: evasion of predators or ability to catch prey. Students then receive evidence cards about the sticklebacks and their prey and predators. They read and consider each evidence card independently, annotating all cards to support deeper thinking.  HW - No Homework

Thursday 11/1/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 3.3.   This final lesson of the chapter concludes students’ investigation of why the distribution of poison traits in the rough-skinned newt population changed over time. Students begin this lesson by participating in the Write and Share routine. The purpose of this routine is for students to support one another’s understanding of how mutations influence changes in trait distribution within populations. Building on what students have learned about why some traits become more common, they learn that a new trait that is created from a mutation only becomes the most common in a population if it is adaptive.  HW - Complete the Homework and Self Assessment portions of today's lesson (Section 3.3.4, 3.3.5).

Wednesday 10/31/18 -All Classes - Students take a break from Natural Selection to investigate how Topographic Maps are created.  We answer the question; "How are 3 dimensional landscapes represented on a 2 dimensional map?"  Students use a landform model to create a topographic map.  HW - No Homework.

Tuesday 10/30/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 3.2.   Students broaden their understanding of mutations by revisiting and discussing the article they read in the last lesson. Students then set up and perform tests in the Sim to see which traits are introduced into the population as a result of mutations and which of those mutant traits become more common.  HW - Complete the Homework portion of today's lesson (Section 3.2.5).

Monday 10/29/18 -All Classes -  Natural Selection 3.1.   Student biologists get new and surprising information about the rough-skinned newts: A histogram of the newt population from over 200 generations ago shows that the trait for the highest level of poison did not exist in the population then. Alex Young asks students to research how new traits are introduced into a population, and students do this by reading a new article from an article set that explains more about mutations. For homework, students run a test in the Simulation to observe how a mutation for more fur spreads through a population of ostrilopes living in a cold environment.  HW - Complete the Homework portion of today's lesson (Section 3.1.4).

 

Friday 10/26/18 -All Classes - Peer review your Scientific Argument letter from Section 4 of Natural Selection 2.4Finish Natural Selection 2.6.   Today's differentiated lesson is designed to provide students with a targeted review and exploration of key concepts and ideas. Based on results of the Critical Juncture Assessment, students will be placed into one of three groups to provide them with differentiated experiences tailored to their particular learning needs. This tailored lesson begins with a differentiated Warm-Up and progresses through work in the Sim, Sorting Tool, and the Amplify Library.  HW - Finish all section from 2.6. 

Thursday 10/25/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.6. Continue Section 4 Scientific Argument portion of Natural Selection 2.4 Today's differentiated lesson is designed to provide students with a targeted review and exploration of key concepts and ideas. Based on results of the Critical Juncture Assessment, students will be placed into one of three groups to provide them with differentiated experiences tailored to their particular learning needs. This tailored lesson begins with a differentiated Warm-Up and progresses through work in the Sim, Sorting Tool, and the Amplify Library.  HW - Complete the Self Assessment portion of today's lesson (Section 2.6.4).  Continue to work on the Scientific Argument (Homework) portion of today's lesson (Section 2.4.4) in your Google Doc.

Wednesday 10/24/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Begin Section 4 (Scientific Argument) of Natural Selection 2.4, Complete Natural Selection 2.5   Students complete a Critical Juncture Assessment (CJ) consisting of 12 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions. The CJ is designed to reveal students’ current levels of understanding of the unit’s core content, and the results are used to place each student at a particular level on the Progress Build.   HW - Finish up the Critical Juncture for Section 2.5.  Continue to work on the Scientific Argument (Homework) portion of today's lesson (Section 2.4.4) in your Google Doc.

Tuesday 10/23/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.4   Students revisit “The Deadly Dare,” the article they read in the previous lesson, to find evidence that will help them answer the Chapter 2 Question. Armed with this evidence, students are introduced to the Reasoning Tool, a graphic organizer which they will use to make explicit connections between the evidence and a claim about why and how the newt population changed.   HW - Complete the Reasoning Tool portion of today's lesson (Section 2.4.3).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Tomorrow.

Monday 10/22/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.3   Students continue to learn about how adaptive and non-adaptive traits lead to natural selection in populations. Students read an article about how poison protects rough-skinned newts from predators. The article gives information on the type of poison found in rough-skinned newts, how it paralyzes and kills predators, and how being poisonous is helpful for survival.  HW - Complete the Homework portion of today's lesson (Section 2.3.4).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz WEDNESDAY.

 

Friday 10/19/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.2  Activities 3, and 4 ONLY!  Students consider a population of spiders and observe their traits from one generation to the next. Using the Traits and Reproduction Sim to model reproduction, the teacher provides a cellular level view of how genes are instructions for making protein molecules and protein molecules determine traits. Once students know that individuals get their traits from the genes they inherit from their parents, they are ready to investigate how reproduction leads to a trait becoming more or less common in a population over time. In this lesson, students use the Natural Selection Simulation to see that individuals with adaptive traits survive longer and reproduce more, passing their adaptive traits on to more individuals in the next generation. Then, they will model their ideas in a response to a new Sherman’s Story about reproduction.    HW - Complete the Homework portion of today's lesson (Section 2.2.4).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Wednesday.

Thursday 10/18/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.2  Activities 1, and 2 ONLY!  Students consider a population of spiders and observe their traits from one generation to the next. Using the Traits and Reproduction Sim to model reproduction, the teacher provides a cellular level view of how genes are instructions for making protein molecules and protein molecules determine traits. Once students know that individuals get their traits from the genes they inherit from their parents, they are ready to investigate how reproduction leads to a trait becoming more or less common in a population over time. In this lesson, students use the Natural Selection Simulation to see that individuals with adaptive traits survive longer and reproduce more, passing their adaptive traits on to more individuals in the next generation. Then, they will model their ideas in a response to a new Sherman’s Story about reproduction.    HW - Complete the Simulation portion of today's lesson (Section 2.2.2).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Wednesday.

Wednesday 10/17/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.1 Activities 3, and 5 ONLY!  Students investigate how individuals get their traits. First, they follow ostrilopes in the Sim in order to see that parents do not always produce offspring with adaptive traits. Then, they engage in a hands-on activity where they see how reproduction and inheritance result in traits that are passed down from generation to generation. Students also gain experience with how different likelihoods of survival and reproduction cause populations to change over time. They also read an article about glowing jellies that provides an example of how organisms get their traits at the molecular level.   HW - Complete the Reflection portion of today's lesson (Section 2.1.5).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Wednesday.

Tuesday 10/16/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 2.1 Activities 1, 2, and 4 ONLY!  Students investigate how individuals get their traits. First, they follow ostrilopes in the Sim in order to see that parents do not always produce offspring with adaptive traits. Then, they engage in a hands-on activity where they see how reproduction and inheritance result in traits that are passed down from generation to generation. Students also gain experience with how different likelihoods of survival and reproduction cause populations to change over time. They also read an article about glowing jellies that provides an example of how organisms get their traits at the molecular level.   HW - Complete the Reading/Annotation portion of today's lesson (Section 2.1.4).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Friday.

Monday 10/15/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.6Students synthesize everything they have learned in this chapter in order to respond to the park visitors’ claims about why the newt population became more poisonous over time. They begin by responding to the first in a series of Sherman’s Stories, a comic strip intended to engage students in critiquing nonscientific ideas about natural selection. Students look at evidence collected in previous lessons and discuss it with their peers in order to understand what causes populations to change over time. They then apply this understanding to the newt population in Oregon State Park to begin explaining what caused that particular population to change and become more poisonous over time.   HW - Complete the Self-Assessment portion of today's lesson (Section 1.6.4).  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.  Vocabulary Quiz Friday.

 

Friday 10/12/18 -All Classes - Students will demonstrate prior science knowledge on the Classroom Diagnostic Test (CDT).  We will Review the Nature of Science Terminology, and review some of the Key Concepts in Kahoot, and Quizlet.   HW - Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Thursday 10/11/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.5.  Students begin to investigate how different traits can affect an organism’s ability to survive by investigating the claim: Yellow color is always an adaptive trait in a yellow environment. Students run tests in the SIM, record their observations, and weigh the evidence for and against the claim. They gain more evidence supporting the idea that adaptive traits become more common in a population over time and non-adaptive traits become less common. They also learn that an environment can affect whether a trait is adaptive or not.   HW -  Finish the homework questions from NS 1.5.4.  Review the Natural Selection unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Wednesday 10/10/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.4.  Students observe that the distribution of fur-level traits in a population of ostrilopes changed over time. This leads them to investigate a population in the Natural Selection Simulation with high variation in fur-level traits. They observe that individuals with low fur levels died in the cold environment. They learn that low fur levels are non-adaptive traits and high fur levels are adaptive traits in a cold environment. Students are then introduced to the printed Natural Selection Modeling Tool and use it to make a prediction about a population of ostrilopes without high fur levels in a cold environment.   HW -  Finish the homework questions from NS 1.4.5.

Tuesday 10/9/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.3.  Students build on what they learned in the previous lesson about traits in a population. They learn that the terms variation and distribution can be used to describe the number of traits in a population and the number of individuals with each trait, and they begin to consider how populations change over time, as measured by generations. Students are introduced to the Natural Selection Simulation and explore how to change the variation and distribution of traits in a population.   HW -  Finish the homework questions from NS 1.3.5.

Monday 10/8/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.2.  Students begin the unit with an introduction to their new role as student biologists tasked with helping to solve a mystery about poisonous newts at the fictional Oregon State Park. A short video introduces students to a present-day newt population, located in a park, that is so poisonous that the poison from a single newt is strong enough to kill dozens of humans. Students learn that the newts in this population haven’t always been so poisonous. They begin considering the question they’ll investigate throughout the chapter, What caused this newt population to become more poisonous?   HW -  Finish the homework reading and questions from NS 1.2.4.

 

Friday 10/5/18 -All Classes - Students will present their scientific argument for the question posed at the beginning of the Geology on Mars unit.  Students will "Peer Review" the arguments presented by other student scientists.  Make revisions, and hand in to me, the project leader.  HW -  No Homework

Thursday 10/4/18 -All Classes - Amplify - Natural Selection 1.1.  Students complete a pre-unit assessment consisting of 18 multiple-choice questions and two written-response questions in which students analyze and interpret data and construct explanations. The pre-unit assessment is diagnostic and designed to reveal students’ understanding of the unit’s core content—including unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts.  HW -  Finish up the GOM Scientific Argument from GOM Lesson 3.4.

Wednesday 10/3/18 -All Classes - Science Folder Check Today.  End of Unit Assessment Today. Amplify GOM 3.5.  Students complete an End-of-Unit Assessment consisting of a written-response question with four parts. The End-of-Unit Assessment is designed to provide formative information about students’ understanding of the crosscutting concept of systems and system models as it relates to content from the unit. It is set in a context related to the Geology on Mars unit, and student performance indicates support students may need or connections to systems and system models that may be built upon in future units.  HW -  Finish up the GOM Scientific Argument and reading from GOM Lesson 3.4.

Tuesday 10/2/18 -All Classes - Vocabulary Quiz Today. Amplify GOM 3.4.  In today's lesson, students use the Writing a Scientific Argument Template write an argument to answer the question: What geologic process could have formed the channel on Mars? Students are prompted to be convincing in their writing as they address a well-informed audience: The planetary geologists at the Universal Space Agency. To help students get started, the teacher models writing a scientific argument, including demonstrating how to use sentence starters and the Reasoning Tool. Then, students write their scientific arguments. Students’ final written arguments also serve as three-dimensional performance assessments with rubrics provided to indicate student progress with unit-specific science concepts, crosscutting concepts, and the science practices of Constructing Explanations; Engaging in Argument from Evidence; and Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information.  HW -  Review the Geology on Mars key concepts in preparation for the End of Unit Assessment.  Prepare your Science folder for grading.  Geology on Mars End-of-Unit Assessment Tomorrow!

Monday 10/1/18 -All Classes - Students will  review the vocabulary terminology used within our Geology on Mars unit. We will review the Key Concepts of the Geology on Mars unit in a game of Kahoot!. We will continue the COSMOS video series.    Cosmos, like our Amplify Science program meshes together the disciplines of science as it tells the stories of our Universe.  HW - Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLETVocabulary Quiz Tomorrow.  Geology on Mars End-of-Unit Assessment Wednesday!

 

Friday 9/28/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 3.3Students review the evidence to construct final arguments about what formed the channel on Mars. In preparation for writing their arguments, students discuss an example of a strong argument and a counterexample. While discussing, they focus on how each argument’s author used the process of reasoning to develop an argument. Students are then introduced to the Reasoning Tool, which they use to develop their own well-constructed arguments.  HW - Complete the "Reasoning About Evidence from Mars” 3.3.2 Discussion questions. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLETVocabulary Quiz Tuesday.  Geology on Mars End-of-Unit Assessment Wednesday!

Thursday 9/27/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 3.2In this lesson, students receive their final piece of information about the channel on Mars: An image of rock found in the channel area. Early in its visit to Mars, the Curiosity rover sent back images of a rock formation composed of sedimentary rock, called conglomerate, near the channel in Gale Crater. Students evaluate one of these images with the assistance of rock samples and reference materials. They then work in pairs to connect this evidence to the two claims about the channel on Mars.  HW - Complete the "Evaluating Claims About the Channel on Mars” 3.2.5 Discussion questions. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLETVocabulary Quiz Tuesday.  Geology on Mars End-of-Unit Assessment Wednesday!

Wednesday 9/26/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 3.1Students are introduced to the Chapter 3 Question: How can we decide which geologic process formed the channel on Mars? They use the Evidence Gradient to review and evaluate the evidence they have gathered so far. Then, they are introduced to new evidence: A triangle-shaped landform discovered at the base of the channel on Mars. Students use the Evidence Gradient to consider how convincing this piece of evidence is in relation to the other pieces of evidence and consider which claim this piece of evidence supports.  HW - Complete the "Evaluating New Information from Mars” 3.1.3 Discussion questions. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET

Tuesday 9/25/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 2.3 Students continue to use models to investigate the question: What geologic process could have formed the channel on Mars? First, students revisit the Flowing Water Model to get evidence for Claim 1 (flowing water formed the channel on Mars). They generate ideas to test in the Flowing Water Model and select one idea to test. They make observations and share these observations in a class discussion. Next, students are introduced to a Flowing Lava Model via an engaging video. The Flowing Lava Model allows students to gather evidence for Claim 2 (flowing lava formed the channel on Mars).  HW - Complete the "Gathering Additional Evidence from Models” 2.3.4 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Monday 9/24/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 2.2 Students reflect on how models provide evidence to answer scientific questions. First, they return to the “Investigating Landforms on Venus” article to deepen their understanding of how Taras Gerya’s model provided evidence for how novae on Venus were formed. Then, the class uses a Flowing Water Model to gather evidence about what formed the channel on Mars. Students make observations of a stream table during the Flowing Water Model demonstration and share these observations in a class discussion.  HW - Complete the "Modeling a Geologic Process” 2.2.4 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET

 

Friday 9/21/18 -All Classes -Period 2 - Amplify GOM 2.1In this lesson, students are introduced to Active Reading—a method of reading carefully and attentively, as a scientist does. Teacher modeling of this approach helps students see how asking meaningful questions while reading can help one understand and remember what one reads. After this introduction, students read an article called “Investigating Landforms on Venus” about how scientists use computer models to explore landforms on Venus. Periods 1,4,5,7 -  Play a few rounds of QUIZLET LIVE to review the vocabulary terminology used within our Geology on Mars unit.  I will also introduce you to the COSMOS video series.  Cosmos, like our Amplify Science program meshes together the disciplines of science as it tells the stories of our Universe.  HW - PERIOD 2 - Complete the "Investigating Landforms on Venus” 2.1.5 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

Thursday 9/20/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 2.1In this lesson, students are introduced to Active Reading—a method of reading carefully and attentively, as a scientist does. Teacher modeling of this approach helps students see how asking meaningful questions while reading can help one understand and remember what one reads. After this introduction, students read an article called “Investigating Landforms on Venus” about how scientists use computer models to explore landforms on Venus.   HW - Complete the "Investigating Landforms on Venus” 2.1.5 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET

Wednesday 9/19/18 -No School

Tuesday 9/18/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 1.3Students are introduced to the process of scientific argumentation. In the Warm-Up, students think about an everyday example of argumentation that prepares them for an introduction to the components of a scientific argument. Students then engage in argumentation about a real mystery that scientists faced for a few weeks: A jelly-donut-like object appeared in the path of the Opportunity rover on the surface of Mars in 2014. Students examine evidence and practice connecting the evidence to claims.  HW - Complete the Investigating a Mystery Object on Mars 1.2.4 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET

Monday 9/17/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 1.2In this lesson, students review the parts of the Earth system by watching a short video. Then, students use an interactive digital tool, Google Mars, to explore the surface of Mars and look for landforms that could be evidence that water once flowed on the planet. After their Google Mars exploration, students are introduced to a channel on the surface of Mars that could have been formed by flowing water or flowing lava. The question of how this channel was formed is the focus for the remainder of the unit.  HW - Complete the Observing the Surfaces of Mars and Earth 1.2.5 Homework. Continue to review the Geology on Mars unit vocabulary terms on QUIZLET.

 

Friday 9/14/18 -All Classes -Finish Amplify GOM 1.1Students consider the Unit Question: How can we search for evidence that other planets were once habitable? To begin to answer this question, students learn that Earth is one of four rocky planets in our solar system. Students compare Earth’s hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and geosphere to those of other rocky planets. Through this activity, students identify Mars as a compelling place to search for evidence of habitability.  HW - Continue to review the vocabulary terms we will use in this unit on QUIZLET Geology on Mars Glossary.

Thursday 9/13/18 -All Classes -Continue Amplify GOM 1.1Students consider the Unit Question: How can we search for evidence that other planets were once habitable? To begin to answer this question, students learn that Earth is one of four rocky planets in our solar system. Students compare Earth’s hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and geosphere to those of other rocky planets. Through this activity, students identify Mars as a compelling place to search for evidence of habitability.  HW - Start to review the vocabulary terms we will use in this unit on QUIZLET Geology on Mars Glossary.

Wednesday 9/12/18 -All Classes -Amplify GOM 1.1Students consider the Unit Question: How can we search for evidence that other planets were once habitable? To begin to answer this question, students learn that Earth is one of four rocky planets in our solar system. Students compare Earth’s hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and geosphere to those of other rocky planets. Through this activity, students identify Mars as a compelling place to search for evidence of habitability.  HW - Start to review the vocabulary terms we will use in this unit on QUIZLET Geology on Mars Glossary.

Tuesday 9/11/18 -No School

Monday 9/10/18 -No School

 

Friday 9/7/18 -All Classes -Review the Hurricane tracks and paths for Hurricane Plot Points 2.  Hurricane Tracking Quiz.  HW - No homework.

Thursday 9/6/18 -All Classes - Using the Hurricane Plot Map 2 track the paths of the Hurricane Plot Points 2.  How can we predict their movement based on their current position.  HW - Finish plotting all hurricanes from Plot #2.

Wednesday 9/5/18 -All Classes - Using the Hurricane Plot Map track the paths of the Historic Hurricanes.  Ho can we predict their movement based on their current position.  HW - Finish plotting all 6 historic hurricanes paths.

Tuesday 9/4/18 -All Classes - Science Folder Set-up. Begin to take a look at Hurricanes.  How do hurricanes form?  How do we plot them?  Can we predict their movement.  HW - Get you Science folder set up.

Monday 9/3/18 -No School

 

Friday 8/31/18 -All Classes - CW- Periods 1&2 - 8th Grade Science introduction.  Class rules and expectations.  Periods 4,5,7 Finish up Science class introduction.  Begin to take a look at Hurricanes.  How do hurricanes form?  How do we plot them?  Can we predict their movement.  HW - Get your class supplies by Tuesday.

Thursday 8/30/18 -All Classes - CW- 8th Grade Science introduction.  Class rules and expectations.  HW - Get your class supplies by Tuesday.